Forward to Petipa

“Honestly, I just can’t stand seeing productions of the classics any more, because I know how far it is from Petipa’s intentions,” Alexei Ratmansky told me a few months back, when we began discussing preparations for his new Sleeping Beauty, based largely on his interpretation of historical sources. He said many other things too. You’ll find them here, in this extensive q&a.

 

Alexei Ratmansky in Sleeping Beauty rehearsal.Photo by Rosalie O'Connor.
Alexei Ratmansky in Sleeping Beauty rehearsal.Photo by Rosalie O’Connor.

A New Sleeping Beauty for ABT

Costume design for a good fairy, by Léon Bakst for the Ballets Russes. See more here: http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/houghton/exhibits/diaghilev/iconic_designs/37_3.cfm
Costume design for a good fairy, by Léon Bakst for the Ballets Russes. See more here: http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/houghton/exhibits/diaghilev/iconic_designs/37_3.cfm

American Ballet Theatre announced today that for it’s seventy-fifth anniversary season (in 2015) the company will unveil a new staging of Sleeping Beauty, choreographed by Alexei Ratmansky, with designs by Richard Hudson inspired by the Léon Bakst designs for the Ballets Russes. It will replace the recent Gelsey Kirlkand staging, which was marred by a frankly ghastly sorbet-colored palette and languid pacing. Hudson did the Beidermeier-inspired sets and costumes for Ratmansky’s  Nutcracker as well as those for the Royal Danish Ballet’s recent La Bayadère (set in colonial India).